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by The Fraser Institute on Thursday Jan 26 2017

The Alberta government could have posted a small budget surplus this year if successive governments had kept program spending increases in line with population growth and inflation, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

But Alberta’s new government is continuing its predecessors’ trend of rapid...

by David Suzuki on Wednesday Jan 25 2017

Since the 1950s, almost everything about work in the developed world has changed dramatically. Rapid technological advances continue to render many jobs obsolete. Globalization has shifted employment to parts of the world with the lowest costs and standards. Most households have gone from one income-earner to at least two. Women have fully integrated into the workforce, albeit often with less-...

by Sara Golling on Wednesday Jan 25 2017

Following the Women's March on Washington and supporting marches in thousands of centres internationally, women's rights and their health and well-being globally have just taken a severe blow.

by Dick Cannings MP on Monday Jan 23 2017

I spent the first weeks of 2017 in New Zealand, celebrating my son’s wedding to a Kiwi girl.  After the wedding, my wife and I drove around some of that beautiful country, enjoying the beaches, birds, wines and green grass of summer.  Fresh apricots in January were a real treat!

by Dermod Travis on Thursday Jan 19 2017

Mere hours before the New York Times went to press with its look at the B.C. Liberal party's ethical scorecard, the party chose to get its 2016 fundraising results out ahead of the storm.

One last chance at political counter-spin and what a marvel of spin it was. U.S. Republican party strategist Karl Rove would have been proud.

In a statement released on Friday, the...

by Charles Jeanes on Monday Jan 16 2017

The Art of the Possible

Politics has been called an art, at universities it’s called science, but whatever we call it, its fascination is perennial. Aristotle simply summed up we humans as “political animals” and that seems appropriate.

by Michael Jessen on Monday Jan 16 2017

The lighter’s flame touches the end of your cigarette; you take a deep drag and the warm smoke enters your lungs.

If it’s your first cigarette, you might instantly find it harder to breathe. The smoke tastes heavy and robust, not entirely unpleasant and reminiscent of drinking coffee for the first time.

Then comes the nicotine hit and you feel suddenly energized, slightly light-...

by Dermod Travis on Sunday Jan 15 2017

After 15 months on the job, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is embarking on a cross-Canada tour, ostensibly to reconnect with Canadians or at least those that can't afford $1,525 to bend his ear in private.

It seems Trudeau – and other federal cabinet ministers – have a fondness for political fundraising events held behind closed doors, far away from prying eyes.

In political slang...

by The Fraser Institute on Thursday Jan 12 2017

Government workers in B.C. receive 7.4 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector, and enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits, too, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

by David Suzuki on Wednesday Jan 11 2017

If you fly over a forest and look down, you’ll see every green tree and plant reaching to the heavens to absorb the ultimate energy source: sunlight. What a contrast when you look down on a city or town with its naked roofs, asphalt roads and concrete sidewalks, all ignoring the sun’s beneficence! Research shows we might benefit by thinking more like a forest.

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