Back to top

Regional News

By Mona Mattei on Tuesday May 18 2010

A glimmer of light is indeed at the end of the tunnel for the railway serving Grand Forks and northwest Washington. A proposal developed by a collaboration between the railway operators, OmniTrax, and the users of the line including International Forest Products Ltd. (Interfor), Pacific Abrasives, International Reload Systems and Columbia Cedar, was presented to local and regional government last week outlining a way to keep the line operating. 

By Harvey Oberfeld on Monday May 17 2010

 Is it my imagination or are the NHL refs favoring the U.S. teams when they play Canadian teams? This radical thought crossed my mind last year during the playoffs: it just seemed to me that whenever I watched a Canadian team in the NHL playoffs come up against ANY U.S. contender, the refs were tougher on the Canadian teams when calling penalties.

By Alex Atamanenko on Friday May 14 2010

Canada-wide changes proposed by Canada Post that will see local mail rerouted from rural communities to sorting centres in cities have drawn the ire of local NDP Member of Parliament Alex Atamanenko (BC Southern Interior).

“This completely defies all logic,” said Atamanenko.

“In this riding, the result will be that some letters will travel over 1,200 kilometres, round trip, for processing in Vancouver on the weekends and back again prior to delivery on Monday.”

By Rob Leggett on Wednesday May 12 2010

Leave it to the NDP to introduce a Private Members Bill that I believe will not only be devastating to the Canadian economy but also one that is seemingly based on inconclusive science.


Bill C-311 requires the Canadian federal government to set regulations to attain a midterm target to bring green house gas emissions 25  per cent below 1990 levels and a long term target to bring emissions 80 per cent below 1990 levels by 2050.

By Mona Mattei on Thursday May 06 2010

After years of farmers protesting regulations developed in 2006 by the B.C. government that prevented farm gate sales of meat without use of a licenced abattoir, the province has sent the industry into confusion with the introduction of two new licences. Local producers are left feeling that they have been chasing their own tails for the last four years, spending time and money trying to build facilities that would provide local meat inspection. Now, it seems that the province is opening up the regulations to allow livestock producers to slaughter their animals again.

By Donovan Hoggan on Wednesday May 05 2010

How many times have you sent email and never heard a reply? If the person at the other end is ducking you, there's nothing I can do. Sometimes, though, it's just a case of too many emails and yours getting deleted.

There are a few things you can do to reduce the chances of your message getting lost.

Step 1: Is it getting through? Try sending to someone outside of your company to ensure that there aren't technological problems blocking your messages.

By Mona Mattei on Thursday Apr 29 2010

As I drove home from the emotionally charged public meeting about the possible closure of the Beaverdell Elementary School, CBC radio was my company. The program was about the shift in our historical culture when the responsibility for caring for the population shifted from church to state. For a large part of history, churches provided education, as well as spiritual, physical and emotional care. At some a point in time that focus shifted and people turned to the state to provide some of these important institutions.

By Alex Atamanenko on Tuesday Apr 27 2010

On Mar. 17, a milestone was reached in Parliament which puts power back in the hands of our elected officials, and by extension, back in the hands of the Canadians who elect them.

An opposition motion, tabled by New Democratic Party (NDP) leader Jack Layton and supported by all opposition parties, limits the Prime Minister’s ability to prorogue parliament to just seven days without the permission of the House of Commons.

By Kyra Hoggan on Wednesday Apr 21 2010

A local homeowner got a potentially explosive surprise when she found what appears to be an ancient bomb hidden within her wall.


Castlegar Sgt. Laurel Mathew said the woman was renovating a very old home, removing drywall, and found several items apparently left there a very long time ago.


“One of the items was a carboard, tube-like device containing yellow sticks marked 'danger' and 'explosive',” Mathew said. “The device was turned over to the RCMP and, in turn, we have contacted our Explosive Device Unit to consult on what this may be.”

By Kyra Hoggan on Wednesday Apr 14 2010

The Castlegar branch of the B.C. Ministry of Forests and Range (known as the Arrow-Boundary Forest District Office), is being downsized to a field office, with fully a quarter of the jobs there being lost.

A spokeswoman for the Ministry told The Source today that, of the 60 positions currently filled in Castlegar, 15 were eliminated in what is being labelled a “workforce adjustment”.

Positions cut include management, as well as clerical and technical staff.
A release from the ministry added:

Pages