Health

California-grown fresh fruit on "class one" recall list

California-grown fresh fruit on "class one" recall list

The brand "Sweet 2 Eat" fresh, whole fruit is being recalled in Canada due to a concern of Listeria monocytogenes contamination.

The fruit varieties include peaches, plums, nectarins and pluats and are being pulled off of supermarket shelves. 

Consumers should look for the brands Wawona, Sweet 2 Eat or Harvest Sweet. Each individual piece of fruit will have a Sweet 2 Eat sticker on it. 

Any recalled items that have already been purchased should be thrown out or returned to the store. 

No campfire ban, at this time, for the Southeast Fire Centre

Campfires are still allowed in the Southeast Fire Centre

Despite a large number of inquiries the Southeast Fire Centre will not be issuing a campfire prohibition at this time.

However, staff will continue to evaluate the situation on a daily basis.

Jordan Turner, Fire Information Officer, said sometimes it is necessary to implement campfire prohibitions to reduce the risk of wildfires.

He said multiple factors determine the timing of such a ban, including weather conditions, local fire activity and whether fire centre staff are encountering widespread non-compliance with campfire regulations.

Selkirk College problem dumpster continues to concern Bear Aware

The dumpsters at Selkirk College Tenth Street Campus are becoming a concern for college staff and Bear Aware. — Photo courtesy Selkirk College

Local coordinator Joanne Siderius of Bear Aware was shocked to see a dumpster located in the parking lot at Selkirk College Tenth Street campus in upper Fairview continue to be a hazard for bears.

Siderius said this dumpster was noted as a problem in the Nelson Areas E and F Bear Hazard Assessment in 2012.

Smoke advisory for the Boundary

Smoke advisory for the Boundary

The Ministry of Environment has issued a Smoky Skies Advisory for the entire Thompson, Fraser Canyon, Okanagan, Similkameen, Nicola, Boundary and Shuswap areas because of forest fire smoke that is affecting the area. 

Smoke concentrations will vary widely as winds, fire behaviour and temperatures change. 

Avoid strenuous outdoor activities. If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, contact your health care provider: difficulty in breathing, chest pain or discomfort, and sudden onset of cough or irritation of airways. 

Smoke advisory for the Boundary

Smoke advisory for the Boundary

The Ministry of Environment has issued a Smoky Skies Advisory for the entire Thompson, Fraser Canyon, Okanagan, Similkameen, Nicola, Boundary and Shuswap areas because of forest fire smoke that is affecting the area. 

Smoke concentrations will vary widely as winds, fire behaviour and temperatures change. 

Avoid strenuous outdoor activities. If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, contact your health care provider: difficulty in breathing, chest pain or discomfort, and sudden onset of cough or irritation of airways. 

Interior Health CEO, Dr. Halpenny, makes house call to Kootenay Lake Hospital

IH CEO, Dr. Robert Halpenny — “We have to look to the future. Technology is going to change the way we do medicine in the future.” — Suzy Hamilton photo, The Nelson Daily

Dr. Robert Halpenny, CEO of Interior Health, made a house call Tuesday for a routine check-up at Kootenay Lake Hospital in Nelson.

“It’s really important that we understand community issues, “ said Halpenny, president and CEO of IH in Kelowna since 2010 .

He was on an annual tour of Interior Health facilities in the region.

In Nelson, he planned to meet with everyone from health board members and staff, to hospital foundation members and others, tour the hospital and get an actual perspective of the distances involved in rural health care.

COMMENT: Palliative Care

COMMENT: Palliative Care

Canada has an aging population and, as a result, will face many challenges. While we have been engaged with some of the items affected at the federal level, there is a vacuum for government initiatives related to end of life care, which is known as palliative care.

Boating Councils remind anglers wearing lifejackets can save lives

There are ways to park the boat and then there are ways not to park the boat.

This week (July 4-13) marks National Fishing Week in Canada.

The Canadian Safe Boating Council (CSBC) and the B.C. Wildlife Federation want to remind anglers that wearing your lifejacket is even more important than wearing your ‘lucky fishing hat’. But they do share one trait.

They both have to be worn to be effective!
 
According to the Canadian Safe Boating Council and the Lifesaving Society, 80 percent of recreational boaters who drown each and every year in Canada were not wearing a lifejacket or Personal Floatation Device (PFD).

Average Canadian family pays big bucks for healthcare says Fraser Institute study

Contrary to public belief, health care in Canada is not free.

The Fraser Institute

Canada Safety Council releases safe ways to enjoy fireworks

If not handled properly, fireworks can cause burn and eye injuries in kids and adults.

It's Canada's 147th birthday Tuesday.

And with birthday celebrations come fireworks.

The Canada Safety Council are advising the public to be careful when discharging fireworks and has a few tips on making Canada Day a safe and happy time.

Celebrate Canada Day safely with fireworks

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