Op/Ed

Nine out of ten elementary schools in B.C. showing improvement were public, according to annual ranking

Ninety per cent of all elementary schools in the province showed significant improvement are public.

Independent elementary schools in British Columbia continue to perform well above average, but this year more than 90 per cent of all elementary schools in the province that showed significant improvement are public, according to the Fraser Institute’s annual ranking of B.C. elementary schools released today.

Party hack screams hacked

The accusations this past week must definitely mean the British Columbia's 41st general election is well underway.

Splat. It would seem British Columbia's 41st general election is well underway.

The uproar this week over news that someone may have hacked the B.C. Liberal party's website is a harbinger of things to come, so fasten your seat belts.

Lost in the charges and counter-charges over the alleged hack is a characteristic most hackers share.

Any hacker worth their salt doesn't want “the hackee” to know they've been hacked.

It's a risk losing your hacking-license offense.

Column: Understanding Climate Change Means Reading Beyond the Headlines

moose with winter ticks

Seeing terms like “post-truth” and “alternative facts” gain traction in the news convinces me that politicians, media workers and readers could benefit from a refresher course in how science helps us understand the world. Reporting on science is difficult at the best of times. Trying to communicate complex ideas and distil entire studies into eye-catching headlines and brief stories can open the door to misinformation and limited understanding.

Canada matters on World Wetlands Day

Canada is a country of wetlands, swamps, fens, marshes and bogs – all of which cover about 13 percent.

Canada proudly has a wetland engineer as its national animal. While other nations have picked wetland wildlife, such as Finland’s whooper swan or Pakistan’s Indus crocodile, only our Canadian beaver reshapes the land by making it hold more water.

By damming small creeks and streams, Canada’s five to 10 million plus beavers build and maintain millions of acres of shallow ponds and meadows across our country. These are not only good for beavers but for other species ranging from moose to wood ducks.

Wage premium for government employees over comparable private-sector workers hits 13.4 per cent in Ontario

Eight of 10 government employees in Ontario (79.7 per cent) are covered by a defined benefit pension plan.

Government employees in Ontario get higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and they retire earlier and take more days off per year, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Editorial: Medical Assistance in Dying

Editorial:  Medical Assistance in Dying

The Rossland Telegraph interviewed a local doctor  (let's call this person "Dr. X") to learn what people in our area suffering from "grievous and irremediable" conditions that result in enduring and intolerable suffering can expect if they conclude that they want to have medical assistance in dying (MAID). 

A Resister’s Guide

A Resister’s Guide

“Government was intended to suppress injustice, but its effect has been to embody and perpetuate it.” – William Godwin

Like Henry David Thoreau, I heartily agree with the motto – “That government is best which governs least”.

When one considers the long list of problems that our governments have tried unsuccessfully to resolve, it is easy to formulate the opinion that governments are motivated more by self interest than principle.

OP/ED: Spending is to blame for Alberta's $10.8 billion deficit

This year’s deficit is expected to top $10.8 billion.

The Alberta government could have posted a small budget surplus this year if successive governments had kept program spending increases in line with population growth and inflation, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

But Alberta’s new government is continuing its predecessors’ trend of rapid spending increases, which has seen nearly uninterrupted deficits in the province since 2008/2009 — even during years when oil prices were at historic highs.

Column: Work Less, Live Better

Column:  Work Less, Live Better

Since the 1950s, almost everything about work in the developed world has changed dramatically. Rapid technological advances continue to render many jobs obsolete. Globalization has shifted employment to parts of the world with the lowest costs and standards. Most households have gone from one income-earner to at least two. Women have fully integrated into the workforce, albeit often with less-than-equal opportunities, conditions and pay.

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