Op/Ed

Letter: FortisBC works with customers experiencing high winter bills

Letter: FortisBC works with customers experiencing high winter bills

To The Editor:

As our customers know, the winter season brings higher electricity bills given the home heating energy requirements compared to the rest of the year.

During the mid-December to mid-February billing period, many parts of our electricity service territory experienced much colder than usual winter temperatures. With colder than usual weather, energy use has been higher than typical, which is now being reflected on customer bills.

Letter: About Access Gas

Letter:  About Access Gas

To the Editor:

I was recently visited by a representative of Access Gas offering me participation in the Customer Choice Program which guarantees you stable pricing for the gas you receive via Fortis for the next five years.  The program is well presented and documented and is perfectly legitimate.

COLUMN: Shine Your Light

COLUMN:  Shine Your Light

Scissors and Paste

The academic supervisor for my post-grad thesis in history would not have approved of what I do in this edition of the Arc. He dismissed the method (with a curl of his lip) thus: “writing with scissors and paste, Charles.”

I have looked over several pieces of writing recently, some of it my own, and I am making a scrapbook of topics that hang together. The theme emerges from the topics.

Health-care spending more than doubled since 2001; projected to keep growing

Health care is projected to consume an even larger portion of program spending over the next 15 years.

Health-care spending by provincial governments has increased by 116 per cent since 2001, and even though increases have slowed recently, health care is projected to consume an even larger portion of program spending over the next 15 years, according to a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Recovery of our most endangered plants and animals is possible

Dan Kraus is Weston Conservation Scientist with the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

I lost my Cracker Jack wildlife cards sometime in the 1980s, but the images printed on the cards are still vivid in my mind. The small cards came wrapped in clear plastic and featured a holographic image of a wildlife species in danger.

I can still see the pencil marks in the top drawer of my old desk where I marked lines to keep them organized. There was a special area in my drawer reserved for the handful of species that lived in my country, and were at risk of extinction.

One simple rule and it still gets messed up

The RCMP has now been brought in to investigate the claim that lobbyists in the province have been making political donations on behalf of their clients, which is contrary to B.C.'s Elections Act.

This past weekend the Globe and Mail reported that lobbyists in the province have been making political donations on behalf of their clients, effectively camouflaging the identity of the real donors and breaking B.C.'s Elections Act in the process.

On Sunday, Elections B.C. announced it was conducting an investigation into the Globe's findings. Five days later, the entire matter was referred to the RCMP.

COLUMN: Faulty logic fuels fossil fools

Emissions chart for US and China, 1990 to 2014

Apparently, fossil fuel companies protect watersheds and rivers by removing oil. That’s according to comments on the David Suzuki Foundation Facebook page and elsewhere, including this: “The amount of contamination occuring [sic] from extraction is far less than if we just left the oil there to continue polluting the waterways.”

Editorial: Governments serving whom?

No charges have been laid in the Mount Polley tailings dam disaster.

In my few years of reporting on Rossland City Council, I have observed different styles of interaction between Council members, and between Council and the public; I have observed different concerns and priorities.  But always, our City Councils seem to have been concerned to do the best thing for Rossland and its people -- according to the values of our Council members of the time.  Yes, priorities have differed, and some errors have happened.  We all know that.  Errors and misjudgments will probably always happen; we just hope the effects are relatively insignificant.

Is silence golden with respect to Columbia River Treaty?

The best public discussion yet on the treaty, it took place a handful of miles from the Peace Arch border crossing where, in 1964, B.C., the U.S. and Canada signed the final protocols.

In 2014-15, the Columbia River Treaty was on the brink of being the next big news story.  The first possible date for either country to give notice of termination (September 2014) passed. 

Gradually, things went quiet. 

The Treaty didn’t seem like news any more.

Conversations about the Treaty have not stopped, however. They are still happening in academic, tribal and government circles, and they are broadening.  

LETTER: Selkirk students campaign against college tuition increases

LETTER: Selkirk students campaign against college tuition increases

Dear Editor,

Since 2001, tuition has increased annually for Selkirk College students.. Last year alone, the cost of attending Selkirk College from the year previous to the current academic year jumped 6.6 per cent. Last year, tuition fees were introduced for adult basic education, which are high school courses taken at the College.

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