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by Timothy Schafer on Sunday Jan 29 2017

Alcohol could become a more pervasive and accessible aspect of Kootenay-Boundary life after the province implemented province-wide updates to the Liquor Control and Licencing Act Monday.

All types of businesses — like barbershops, salons, book stores and art galleries — are now eligible to apply for a liquor licence, after the Liquor Policy Review acted upon some of its 73...

by The Fraser Institute on Thursday Jan 26 2017

The Alberta government could have posted a small budget surplus this year if successive governments had kept program spending increases in line with population growth and inflation, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

But Alberta’s new government is continuing its predecessors’ trend of rapid...

by David Suzuki on Wednesday Jan 25 2017

Since the 1950s, almost everything about work in the developed world has changed dramatically. Rapid technological advances continue to render many jobs obsolete. Globalization has shifted employment to parts of the world with the lowest costs and standards. Most households have gone from one income-earner to at least two. Women have fully integrated into the workforce, albeit often with less-...

by Contributor on Tuesday Jan 24 2017

B.C. credit unions will keep their preferential tax advantage a little longer as the provincial government intends to pause for one year the phase-out of the tax advantage credit unions have enjoyed.

The change will be introduced Feb. 21 as part of Balanced Budget 2017, Finance Minister Michael de Jong announced Tuesday.

by Contributor on Sunday Jan 22 2017

An updated Liquor Control and Licencing Act and regulation come into force Monday, January 23, that will create new opportunities for businesses, increase convenience for consumers and enhance the Province’s commitment to social responsibility.

“We’ve come a long way since we first began the process of updating B.C.’s antiquated liquor laws," said said Coralee Oakes, Minister of Small...

by Rossland Telegraph on Wednesday Jan 18 2017

There will be non-stop fun at the Rossland Winter Carnival -- the longest-running such event in Canada, it's been happening every year since 1898. With so much going on, people will wish they could defy the laws of physics by  being in more than one place at a time.  Here's a smattering of the events.

by Kyra Hoggan on Tuesday Jan 17 2017

A coalition of downtown business owners wants a $40,000 feasibility study for a pedestrian/bicycle bridge spanning the Columbia River between Selkirk College and Zuckerberg Island.

At its regular meeting Monday night, city council was asked to contribute $10,000 to the initiative. Presenter Jackie Letkeman told council that CBT has offered a verbal commitment to fund half the study,...

by Contributor on Monday Jan 16 2017

Last year Celgar’s Health and Safety department, headed by Safety Manager Mark Goebel, made the decision to upgrade Celgar’s onsite Emergency Transport Vehicle.  Although not used frequently, the 1991 ambulance has served Celgar well for approximately 20 years to transport patients to medical aid when required. 

by Dermod Travis on Sunday Jan 15 2017

After 15 months on the job, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is embarking on a cross-Canada tour, ostensibly to reconnect with Canadians or at least those that can't afford $1,525 to bend his ear in private.

It seems Trudeau – and other federal cabinet ministers – have a fondness for political fundraising events held behind closed doors, far away from prying eyes.

In political slang...

by The Fraser Institute on Thursday Jan 12 2017

Government workers in B.C. receive 7.4 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector, and enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits, too, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

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